TASTING NOTES

CLOUDY PALE ALE

Refreshing with tropical, stone fruit aromas and flavours, a smooth mouthfeel and low bitterness and malt, Cloudy has the beautiful golden haze you’ve come to expect from the legends on our brew deck. Sits at an ABV of 5%.

FOOD PAIRINGS

Cloudy’s bold and refreshing flavour sees it pair well with just about any of your pub favourites: try it with your bangas & mash, parmi/parma (don’t @ us), burger and fries or the classic fish and chips. When you’re out of the pub, we also like to use Cloudy to quench the thirst that comes with a good curry.

CLOUDY – THE HISTORY

If you’ve been a long-time fan of our iconic Original Pacific Ale, it might be time to try something different. Introducing Cloudy Pale Ale, Pacific Ale’s big brother, hitting venues and bottle shops this week and doing its job of making the world a bit more delicious.

It comes in a sexy burnt orange can, bottle or fresh from the tap and is perfect for those moments when the sun starts to go down on an epic day and the vibes start to come up. Read more on our blog for the backstory.

THIS BEER IS A FORCE FOR GOOD

Did you know that we donate $1 for every 100L of beer sold to our inGrained Foundation? Through inGrained we support local-level social and environmental organisations who are changing our communities from the ground up. So just by drinking this beer, you’re helping Aus become that little bit gooder.

Love the passionfruit’tiness, bitter and clean after taste. 

Jared

Loved this brew. Will buy and drink again.

Pete

I enjoyed it, great looking beer, holds up well in the glass, great nose which always helps. An authentic pale ale for me. Good work!

Anna

Always been a big fan of Pacific Ale and Cloud Catcher, Cloudy is just gone next level!

Mick L
  • Our Guide to Australia’s Beer Sizes and Names

    Need answers now? Click here to be taken to our beer size cheat sheet down the page.

    If you've travelled Australia, you might have experienced the perplexity of different beer sizes, shapes, and names across state lines.

    Just like the never-ending ‘parma or parmy’ debate, the naming conventions of our beers can confuse even the most seasoned beer drinker when visiting interstate.

    Let’s dive into how each state in Australia names their beer sizes.

    New South Wales’ beer sizes

    We’ll start with our birthplace, the great state of New South Wales. We’re a little biased, but these sizes make the most sense to us.

    The most standard size to order is the humble schooner, clocking in at 425mL. This is largely the same across all of Australia (looking at you, South Australia) and is a popular choice across the country. Not too big, not too small, just right.

    Slightly larger in size is the pint, which holds 570mL. For quenching a more serious thirst, a pint is another very popular choice.

    Larger still is the jug, with the standard size of 1,140mL in New South Wales. The jug is perfect for pouring yourself and a friend a pint each, or just under three schooners. The jug’s size is standard across the country.

    Our middy is the smallest standard size that you can expect to order, making it ideal for those who have just come down for one. This comes in at 285mL.

    We’ve also got our uniquely named schmiddy, a 350mL glass that sits in between the schooner and middy. Buy a pair of schmiddy glasses from our online store today.

    Man pours a middy into a Stone & Wood glass

    Pictured: A middy of Green Coast lager is poured at our Byron brewery.

    Queensland’s beer sizes

    Queensland’s different beer sizes are named largely the same as in New South Wales.

    Queensland shares the same schooner size as NSW, coming in at 425mL and a pint is also 570mL, the same as most other states, and their jug is 1,140mL. 

    Where Queensland might differ from your home is with their smaller size, with the 285mL largely referred to as a pot instead of a middy.

    Victoria’s beer sizes

    Exploring further south, Victoria is again fairly similar to Queensland and New South Wales.

    A schooner is the same at 425mL, and a pint is also 570mL. Asking for a pot of beer will get you a 285mL sized serving. Jugs remain the same, coming in at 1,140mL.

    Asking for a glass of beer in some places in Melbourne will get you a 200mL size, even smaller than the more standard pot.

    Hot tip: Victorians will tell you that if you don’t specify a size, it’s likely you’ll be poured a pot. Most other states default to a 425mL schooner.

    South Australia’s beer sizes

    Here’s where things get a little confusing. South Australia is by far the most unique of all states, with names that are widely accepted elsewhere in the country as one size referring to a smaller size in this region.

    In Adelaide and surrounds, the standard and most common size is the pint, coming in at 425mL. This is not to be confused with the imperial pint, which comes in at the size of 570mL. Their most widely accepted small size is called a schooner and comes in at 285mL.

    While these all differ from other states, the ever-reliable jug remains the same at 1,140mL.

    The Northern Territory’s beer sizes

    The Northern Territory’s more tropical weather makes larger sizes slightly less popular to the average drinker, as they go warm quick if not enjoyed fast enough.

    Ask for a handle of beer if you’re after a 285mL, smaller beer to enjoy (although middy or pot are generally accepted too). These may come with a handle, so you don’t warm the beer too quickly holding it in your hand.

    Schooners are the same as most other regions of Australia, coming in at 425mL. Pints and jugs are also the same at 570mL and 1,140mL.

    Tasmania’s beer sizes

    The Tassie pint remains unchanged to most other states, coming in at 570mL.

    Tasmania’s name for their 285mL beer size is either pot or ten depending on who you speak to, with the name ten coming from the fact that 285mL is ten ounces of liquid. In keeping with this theme, a 425mL beer is referred to as either a schooner or a fifteen.

    Western Australia’s beer sizes

    Just like New South Wales, a middy is the most common name for a 285mL beer in Perth and surrounds. You might also hear this being referred to as a half-pint.

    After this, the schooner (425mL), the pint (570mL) and the jug (1,140mL) remain the same as the rest of the country.

    Australian Capital Territory’s beer sizes

    Similarly to Western Australia, the capital also refers to 285mL beers as a middy or a half-pint. Double this in size for a standard pint at 570mL, with the schooner coming in at the mostly standard 425mL.

    Our Australian beer size cheat sheet

    To recap, there’s a lot of variation. It’s not an exact science, with differences by region and even each venue.

    By and large, jugs, pints and schooners are a pretty universally understood size (except in SA), with most of the smaller options often having a name unique to the region.

     

    NSW QLD VIC  SA NT TAS WA ACT
    200mL - - glass - - - - -
    285mL middy pot pot schooner handle (or middy/pot) pot (or ten) middy middy (or half-pint)
    350mL schmiddy - - - - - - -
    425mL schooner schooner schooner pint schooner schooner (or fifteen) schooner schooner
    570mL pint pint pint imperial  pint pint pint pint pint
    1,140mL jug jug jug jug jug jug jug jug

     

    As Aussies, we’re a diverse bunch. Our unique ways of enjoying beer are a perfect metaphor for our unique geography and people, and at Stone & Wood we think that’s more than worth celebrating.

    So, whatever size glass you choose to drink from, raise it with us in celebrating the different ways in which Aussies enjoy their beer.

    Find our range of beer available for purchase online, including the Stone & Wood core range and our limited releases. We also have a range of merchandise (including beer glasses)!

    Reading times: 5 mins

    Our Guide to Australia’s Beer Sizes and Names

    We've broken down the different names and sizes of beers you can expect to find across the country. Read on for more.

    Read story
  • Stouts & Porters: What’s The Difference?

    The Origins of Stouts & Porters

    Stouts have a storied history that stretches all the way back to 18th century England. Originally, the term stout was used to describe strong, hearty porters – but over the years, stouts evolved into their own distinct category. They're both characterised by their robust flavours, slightly higher alcohol content, and the use of roasted barley, which adds that signature dark colour and that complex, roasty and toasty aroma.

    It’s this warm and comforting flavour profile that makes these dark brews such a perfect fit for the winter months, making them a popular choice as the mercury drops.

    The Australian craft industry has embraced these dark and full-bodied beers. Today, you’ll find stouts of all kinds crafted with a uniquely Aussie twist, incorporating local ingredients and flavours that make them truly our own.

    Stout vs. Porter: What’s The Difference?

    Alright, craft beer lovers, let’s dive into the age-old debate: what sets a stout apart from a porter? These two dark and delicious brews often get confused, and for good reason. They share a common history and a similar flavour profile, but there are key differences that beer enthusiasts should know.

    The Origins of Their Names

    The name "porter" itself comes from the hardworking porters who favoured this hearty brew. Stouts, originally known as "stout porters," were simply stronger versions of porters. Over time, stouts have evolved into their own distinct style.

    The Different Brewing Processes

    The key difference between a stout and a porter lies in the ingredients and brewing techniques. Stouts typically use roasted barley, which gives them that signature dark colour and robust, coffee-like flavour. Porters, on the other hand, often use malted barley, resulting in a smoother, more chocolatey taste.

    Flavour Profiles of Stouts and Porters

    Stouts

    So, what makes a stout a stout? At its core, a stout is defined by its use of roasted malt or barley, which gives it that deep, dark colour and rich, robust flavour profile. When you pour a stout, you’re greeted with a thick, creamy head, and as you take that first sip, expect to encounter notes of coffee, chocolate, and sometimes even a hint of burnt toast – a unique delight that’s both comforting and complex.

    But it’s not just the taste that sets stouts apart. The mouthfeel of a stout is often velvety and smooth, sometimes with a slight sweetness or a bitter finish, depending on the specific style. From dry stouts like the always recognisable Guinness, to the sweeter and more decadent milk stouts, there’s a stout for everyone.

    Common food pairings with stouts include chocolate desserts, grilled meats and sharp cheeses, all of which complement the complex flavours well.

    Porters

    The flavour profile of porters is typically smoother and more approachable flavour to the boldness of stouts. When you pour a porter, you’ll notice its deep brown to black colour and a more subtle head.

    The first sip of a porter often reveals a balance of chocolate, caramel, and toffee notes, with a roasted finish that’s less intense than a stout. Porters tend to have a medium body, offering a rich yet smoother mouthfeel that’s easier on the palate. They can range from the robust Baltic porters to the lighter, more easy-going brown porters, providing a spectrum of flavours for different tastes.

    Food pairings that pair well with porters include barbecued meats, roast vegetables and even nutty desserts such as pecan pie.

    Stone Beer 2024

    Our own unique take on a wood-fired porter, our annual Stone Beer for 2024 is now available online and in select pubs and bottle shops.

    Incorporating notes of roasted coffee, dark chocolate and smoky Macadamia, our 6% ABV Stone Beer is best paired with delicious BBQ meats, ribs and hearty stews around a campfire with good company. Rug up and enjoy today!

    Reading times: 3 mins

    Stouts & Porters: What’s The Difference?

    Alright, craft beer lovers, let’s dive into the age-old debate: what sets a stout apart from a porter?

    Read story
  • Stone & Wood 2023 Beer As A Force For Good Report

    Reflecting on our work over the past year

    Today is World Environmental Day, more than a day to do ‘good’, we think of today as a moment to pause and reflect on our work over the past year. As a company founded on the idea of using beer as a force for good, we’re always always looking at ways to reduce our impact, and be of better service to the environment that supports us.

    Across the board we are committed to reducing our environmental footprint and improving our practices. In order to keep track of our journey, hold ourselves accountable, and share our learnings with the community – each year we release our Beer As A Force For Good report. This report is open to the public so you can gain a better understanding of where we are as company, and where our focus is for the future. We believe learnings are best when shared and we love having a beer and a yarn about how we can better use beer as a force for good.

    Some highlights over the past year include:

    • We released NRB, Northern Rivers Beer, to the public, which is our first beer made from Certified Sustainable Ingredients. NRB is currently only available in the Northern Rivers region but is an exciting testament to our ambition for the future of sustainable brewing.
    • In 2023 we diverted 90.8 percent of waste (excluding spent grain) from landfill. This is a 5.5% improvement from 2022.
    • At Murwillumbah brewery, thanks to re-using treated wastewater with a UFRO system (Ultra-Filtration Reverse Osmosis system) and capturing water from our bottle rinse and pipe it through our refrigeration system and re-using cleaning chemicals recovered through a CIP system, we are stoked to be 20 percent lower than industry averages for our water usage for the year. 
    • We are 32% lower than industry averages for our purchased electricity consumption this year. This is something we are super proud of for the period. At our Murbah site we run a 100kW solar system on our brewery roof and the Byron Brewery roof we run a 80kw solar system.

    • This contributed to a carbon emission reduction in 2023 equivalent to an approximate planting of 2,630 trees.
    • We are also pleased to announce that in 2023 our Murwillumbah brewery became certified under ISO14001, reflecting a robust and comprehensive environmental management system embedded across our main production site.

    Read the full 2023 Beer As A Force For Good Report here.

    ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY

    ‘Ngalingaa Jagun Gunuul, Arakwal Jagun’ By Nickolla Clark “The artwork brings forward Bundjalung stories, Arakwal Country is well known as a meeting place for all of Bundjalung. Many tribes, would walk, rest and gather here. They walked on songlines, singing in language following the escarpments of Koonyum Range to the shorelines of Tallows and to far north Queensland for the Bunya Nut festival. They walked the Brunswick River on low tide, they twisted their feet in the sand to collect yugari (pippis). Together they shared culture and danced on this sacred ground. This painting highlights the landscape of Byron Bay, where the rainforest meets the sea and lifestyle and culture is hidden within. Arakwal Country is an abundant and versatile place, a marker telling you where you are”.

    We acknowledge the First Nations people, the custodians of this beautiful Country. We pay respects to Elders past, present and emerging. We recognise that Indigenous peoples have protected the land, sea, and waterways for tens
    of thousands of years. We show our gratitude for these strong foundations from the past and embrace guidance for the future.

    ‘Ngalingaa Jagun Gunuul, Arakwal Jagun’ By Nickolla Clark, a new artwork on display at Stone & Wood Byron Bay

    “The artwork brings forward Bundjalung stories, Arakwal Country is well known as a meeting place for all of Bundjalung. Many tribes, would walk, rest and gather here. They walked on songlines, singing in language following the escarpments of Koonyum Range to the shorelines of Tallows and to far north Queensland for the Bunya Nut festival. They walked the Brunswick River on low tide, they twisted their feet in the sand to collect yugari (pippis). Together they shared culture and danced on this sacred ground. This painting highlights the landscape of Byron Bay, where the rainforest meets the sea and lifestyle and culture is hidden within. Arakwal Country is an abundant and versatile place, a marker telling you where you are”.

    Reading times: 2 mins

    Stone & Wood 2023 Beer As A Force For Good Report

    Reflecting on our work over the past year Today is World Environmental Day, more than a day to do ‘good’, we think of today as a moment to pause and...

    Read story
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